OUR LEADING CONSERVATION EFFORTS

“Comprehensive conservation planning is the cornerstone of the Prairie Wildlife land management philosophy. Conservation planning involves defining specific resource concerns (soil, water or wildlife), identifying specific conservation practices that will improve ecosystem health, visualizing how these practices fit into the larger landscape context, implementing the practice, and evaluating the response. Prairie Wildlife applies this iterative approach in an adaptive resource management framework to every management decision.”


“ When we become aware of a resource concern; whether it be soil erosion, water quality, or wildlife habitat, we ask the question “What would a better landscape look like? What would it take to get from where we are to where we want to be? Which conservation practices will improve ecosystem health and restore ecosystem function in this situation? How will those conservation practices fit into the larger landscape?”

These visionary practices are a cornerstone to our mission.

 

invasive plants

ERADICATE INVASIVE PLANTS

We replace fescue & Bermuda with native, more
wildlife-friendly plants.

cow

 

FENCE OUT DRAINAGES TO KEEP OUT CATTLE

More good cover. Specifically provides travel corridors and bedding cover for White-tailed deer. Drastically decreases erosion.

 

 

 

 

 

 

eradicate

PLANT NATIVE GRASS BORDERS AROUND CROP FIELDS

Native grasses create nesting habitat, brood rearing habitat, seed for food, and year round protection for all wildlife. Grasses provide food and cover and greatly reduce erosion.

field

 

PLANT SHRUB CORRIDORS

More cover! Hedge rows break up large fields, connect scattered patches of habitat, and provide travel corridors and bedding spaces for wildlife.

 

 

 

 

 

 

hinge-cut hedgerows

HINGE CUTTING HEDGE ROWS

Provides more cover at the ground level and reduces the number of perches used by hawks that feed on quail.

 

disc cutter

 

BURN NATIVE GRASS FIELDS & FALL STRIP DISKING

This reduces build up of dead plant material at ground level, makes a more open stand of grass so wildlife, like bobwhite quail, can move freely through the grass. Stimulates the germination of seed producing forbs and promotes new growth.

 

 

 

 

 

 

MANAGE EXISTING & NEW FOOD PLOTS

 

Provides vast amounts of food for the winter months. Benefits many wildlife species.

milo food plot

fire

 

 

 

 

 

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